realkidsgoodbooks:

We March by Shane W. Evans (Roaring Book Press, 2012).
A family wakes up before dawn to attend the historic March on Washington. Like his other book, Underground, this book is simmered down to the simplest sentences. This strategy captures so much with so little, giving young kids a first glimpse of the struggle for Civil Rights in the U.S. 
In an interview at Kirkus Reviews Evans talks about We March:

That’s what a march is, people bonding together. That’s the original social media—250,000 people gathering, prior to texts, prior to cell phones. It’s a powerful tool. There’s something spiritual about it, when many people come together with one heart.
When you think about what was going on in 1963, not so long after that march, there was an explosion that killed four little girls. Even in my own child-mind, I think, “After that speech, all was good.” It was not all good. Everybody didn’t get with that “I Have a Dream” speech. We can never be complacent. We can always fall backward.

(Image Source: Washington Post)

realkidsgoodbooks:

We March by Shane W. Evans (Roaring Book Press, 2012).

A family wakes up before dawn to attend the historic March on Washington. Like his other book, Underground, this book is simmered down to the simplest sentences. This strategy captures so much with so little, giving young kids a first glimpse of the struggle for Civil Rights in the U.S. 

In an interview at Kirkus Reviews Evans talks about We March:

That’s what a march is, people bonding together. That’s the original social media—250,000 people gathering, prior to texts, prior to cell phones. It’s a powerful tool. There’s something spiritual about it, when many people come together with one heart.

When you think about what was going on in 1963, not so long after that march, there was an explosion that killed four little girls. Even in my own child-mind, I think, “After that speech, all was good.” It was not all good. Everybody didn’t get with that “I Have a Dream” speech. We can never be complacent. We can always fall backward.

(Image Source: Washington Post)