The McNally Jackson Picture Book Department of Cultural Literacy is honored to feature this definitive work on dragon eating customs throughout history. 

Dragons Love Tacos, written by Adam Rubin, illustrated by Daniel Salmieri, perfect for everyone. 

Saturday, Nov. 24, 11:30 a.m.Books & Art
If you’re in town, join us Saturday to share exciting new books and revisit some of our favorites. We’ll be inspired to invent and illustrate our own stories, gift paper and cards, using collage techniques and various textured materials. We’re featuring Oliver Jeffers’ hilarious new book, This Moose Belongs to Me — a timely story about “the trials and tribulations of antlers and ownership.” 
Hosted by Yvonne Brooks. All ages welcome. Free.

Saturday, Nov. 24, 11:30 a.m.
Books & Art

If you’re in town, join us Saturday to share exciting new books and revisit some of our favorites. We’ll be inspired to invent and illustrate our own stories, gift paper and cards, using collage techniques and various textured materials. We’re featuring Oliver Jeffers’ hilarious new book, This Moose Belongs to Me — a timely story about “the trials and tribulations of antlers and ownership.”

Hosted by Yvonne Brooks. All ages welcome. Free.

Michelle Knudsen and Scott Magoon came by last week to read-aloud from their new picture book, Big Mean Mike.

Big Mean Mike is the biggest, toughest dog in the whole neighborhood. He has a big, mean car that he likes to drive around the big, mean streets. Everyone knows that Mike is big and mean, and that’s just the way he likes it. But one day a tiny, fuzzy bunny shows up in his car.

And what does Big Mean Mike do with the wittle, fuzzy bunny? It may surprise you. It may please you. It certainly pleased us, especially when we heard Scott’s Big Mean Mike voice, which we still don’t believe he’d never practiced before. 

They left us plenty of signed copies, so if you’d like one of your own, just follow this link and write “signed” in the notes area of your order form.

Thanks again, Michelle and Scott! We had a great time.

Staff Pick
The Obstinate Pen insists on being read out loud. Whether the audience is packed with grade school skeptics or restless preschoolers, kids chuckle and chortle at each rebellious revision and hilarious encounter. (Try saying “Mrs. Norkham Pigeon-Smythe of Farflungdom” with a straight face.) The eponymous protagonist is cheeky, subversive, and astute; literary cousin of the iconoclastic Cat in the Hat, swashbuckling D’Artagnan, and the truth-telling child in The Emperor’s New Clothes. You’ll love this book.
- Yvonne

Staff Pick

The Obstinate Pen insists on being read out loud. Whether the audience is packed with grade school skeptics or restless preschoolers, kids chuckle and chortle at each rebellious revision and hilarious encounter. (Try saying “Mrs. Norkham Pigeon-Smythe of Farflungdom” with a straight face.) The eponymous protagonist is cheeky, subversive, and astute; literary cousin of the iconoclastic Cat in the Hat, swashbuckling D’Artagnan, and the truth-telling child in The Emperor’s New Clothes. You’ll love this book.

- Yvonne

realkidsgoodbooks:

We March by Shane W. Evans (Roaring Book Press, 2012).
A family wakes up before dawn to attend the historic March on Washington. Like his other book, Underground, this book is simmered down to the simplest sentences. This strategy captures so much with so little, giving young kids a first glimpse of the struggle for Civil Rights in the U.S. 
In an interview at Kirkus Reviews Evans talks about We March:

That’s what a march is, people bonding together. That’s the original social media—250,000 people gathering, prior to texts, prior to cell phones. It’s a powerful tool. There’s something spiritual about it, when many people come together with one heart.
When you think about what was going on in 1963, not so long after that march, there was an explosion that killed four little girls. Even in my own child-mind, I think, “After that speech, all was good.” It was not all good. Everybody didn’t get with that “I Have a Dream” speech. We can never be complacent. We can always fall backward.

(Image Source: Washington Post)

realkidsgoodbooks:

We March by Shane W. Evans (Roaring Book Press, 2012).

A family wakes up before dawn to attend the historic March on Washington. Like his other book, Underground, this book is simmered down to the simplest sentences. This strategy captures so much with so little, giving young kids a first glimpse of the struggle for Civil Rights in the U.S. 

In an interview at Kirkus Reviews Evans talks about We March:

That’s what a march is, people bonding together. That’s the original social media—250,000 people gathering, prior to texts, prior to cell phones. It’s a powerful tool. There’s something spiritual about it, when many people come together with one heart.

When you think about what was going on in 1963, not so long after that march, there was an explosion that killed four little girls. Even in my own child-mind, I think, “After that speech, all was good.” It was not all good. Everybody didn’t get with that “I Have a Dream” speech. We can never be complacent. We can always fall backward.

(Image Source: Washington Post)

McNally Jackson was thrilled to welcome Mac Barnett, author of Extra Yarn, and Fiona Robinson, author and illustrator of What Animals Really Like, to our children’s section this past Saturday. Signed copies of their marvelous books are available through our website at 10% off until May 6th with the coupon code “picturebooks”. We’re happy to gift wrap and ship anywhere within the U.S. 

McNally Jackson was thrilled to welcome Mac Barnett, author of Extra Yarn, and Fiona Robinson, author and illustrator of What Animals Really Like, to our children’s section this past Saturday. Signed copies of their marvelous books are available through our website at 10% off until May 6th with the coupon code “picturebooks”. We’re happy to gift wrap and ship anywhere within the U.S. 

Staff Pick
Little Bird
by Germano Zullo

A great picture book has a kernel of mystery on every page. The text and the illustrations act separately, but are inextricable. It appeals to the childlike curiosity in us all. This book does all of these things, and executes its message with simple, sophisticated elegance from beginning to end, with a breathtaking finish.

Sarah G.

Staff Pick

by Germano Zullo



A great picture book has a kernel of mystery on every page. The text and the illustrations act separately, but are inextricable. It appeals to the childlike curiosity in us all. This book does all of these things, and executes its message with simple, sophisticated elegance from beginning to end, with a breathtaking finish.



"Picture books are generally put on the shelves of bookstores, libraries, lounge rooms and bedrooms for young children, where they apparently belong. Picture books are synonymous with Children’s Literature. But is this is a necessary condition of the art form itself? Or is it just a cultural convention, more to do with existing expectations, marketing prejudices and literary discourse?"

Shaun Tan asks: Picture Books: Who are they for? 

Read the rest of the article here

(via realkidsgoodbooks)

(via rainetoday)

Staff Picks


And Then It’s Spring

This book would be sadly incomplete were any single detail removed or revised. The deftness of Erin Stead’s hand is evident in her characterizing illustrations. Julie Fogliano’s text is subtly suspenseful, humorous, and all-around lovely. This is a perfect springtime celebration. 

Also, the dog is brilliant.
Sarah G.


When Blue Met Egg


One winter morning, Blue wakes to find a strange “egg" in her nest. Has someone lost it? She looks all over New York, but no one seems to be missing an egg. Come spring, she wakes to find egg gone! Its pot has fallen, and lying before it on the grass is a healthy flower. The flower must be egg! Kids will love being in on this adorable joke, especially local kiddos who can point out some of their favorite landmarks in the illustrations. 
Sarah G.
I must have read these books every night. This is, indeed, a sad, sad day.
theatlantic:

Remembering Jan Berenstain, co-creator of ‘The Berenstain Bears’

In a sad development for those who grew up with her ubiquitous children’s books, Jan Berenstain, co-creator of The Berenstain Bears, died on Friday at age 88 after suffering a severe stroke the day before, reports the Associated Press. The longtime resident of Solebury, Pennsylvania is survived by four grandchildren and her two sons, one of which, named Mike, told the AP’s Joann Loviglio that his mother remained productive until the end. ”She was working on two books and had been doing illustrations until the day before she passed away.” All told, about 260 million of the jovial books filled with time-tested, family-oriented adages made their way into the hands of children and parents since the series first began.
Read more. [Image: Associated Press]

I must have read these books every night. This is, indeed, a sad, sad day.

theatlantic:

Remembering Jan Berenstain, co-creator of ‘The Berenstain Bears’

In a sad development for those who grew up with her ubiquitous children’s books, Jan Berenstain, co-creator of The Berenstain Bears, died on Friday at age 88 after suffering a severe stroke the day before, reports the Associated Press. The longtime resident of Solebury, Pennsylvania is survived by four grandchildren and her two sons, one of which, named Mike, told the AP’s Joann Loviglio that his mother remained productive until the end. ”She was working on two books and had been doing illustrations until the day before she passed away.” All told, about 260 million of the jovial books filled with time-tested, family-oriented adages made their way into the hands of children and parents since the series first began.

Read more. [Image: Associated Press]

(via wnyc)