Someone loved Sarah Gerard’s staff pick of “The Secret Tree” enough to eat it.

Someone loved Sarah Gerard’s staff pick of “The Secret Tree” enough to eat it.

October 25th, 6pm
Talented teenage writers read their work for a launch celebrating the 2013 New York City Scholastic Writing Awards. The Scholastic Awards is the largest, longest-running and most prestigious recognition program for teenagers in the U.S., honoring students for their excellence in fiction, journalism, essay writing, poetry, and more. 
Dating back to 1924, the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards include among their past winners acclaimed writers such as Sylvia Plath, Truman Capote, Joyce Carol Oates and Andy Warhol. Over $25 million dollars have been given over the awards’ history, and students also receive the chance to earn scholarships, and to have their work published. Winning writers who have demonstrated their originality, proficiency and vision, will read a selection of work at the event. All are welcome.

October 25th, 6pm

Talented teenage writers read their work for a launch celebrating the 2013 New York City Scholastic Writing Awards. The Scholastic Awards is the largest, longest-running and most prestigious recognition program for teenagers in the U.S., honoring students for their excellence in fiction, journalism, essay writing, poetry, and more. 


Dating back to 1924, the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards include among their past winners acclaimed writers such as Sylvia Plath, Truman Capote, Joyce Carol Oates and Andy Warhol. Over $25 million dollars have been given over the awards’ history, and students also receive the chance to earn scholarships, and to have their work published.

Winning writers who have demonstrated their originality, proficiency and vision, will read a selection of work at the event. All are welcome.

It’s Clifford’s 50th birthday this year, and Scholastic is celebrating with a beautiful collection of classic Clifford stories. 
You might be used to the above clean-lined, computer-drawn Clifford, but the original Clifford was a scruffy-haired, pen-and-ink and colored-pencil charmer. 
The collection includes six classic stories: “Clifford the Big Red Dog”, “Clifford at the Circus”, “Clifford Gets a Job”, “Clifford Takes a Trip”, “Clifford’s Good Deeds”, and “Clifford’s Tricks”, as well as an original letter from Bridwell to the reader.
scholasticbookclubs:

pbsparents:

Today’s throwback Thursday is everybody’s favorite big red dog, Clifford!

Let’s not forget that it’s also his 50th Birthday year!

It’s Clifford’s 50th birthday this year, and Scholastic is celebrating with a beautiful collection of classic Clifford stories

You might be used to the above clean-lined, computer-drawn Clifford, but the original Clifford was a scruffy-haired, pen-and-ink and colored-pencil charmer. 

The collection includes six classic stories: “Clifford the Big Red Dog”, “Clifford at the Circus”, “Clifford Gets a Job”, “Clifford Takes a Trip”, “Clifford’s Good Deeds”, and “Clifford’s Tricks”, as well as an original letter from Bridwell to the reader.

scholasticbookclubs:

pbsparents:

Today’s throwback Thursday is everybody’s favorite big red dog, Clifford!

Let’s not forget that it’s also his 50th Birthday year!

(via greenlightbklyn)

Kid Review
Infinity Ring Book 2: Divide and Conquer
Carrie Ryan
Pub 11-2012, Scholastic

Divide and Conquer is the second novel in the Infinity Ring series by Carrie Ryan (also the author of the series The Forest of Hands and Teeth). When I began reading, I felt that instead of starting with the second book I should have started with the first book in this series. But I don’t think I will read another one: I would have to read the first one and I am not as interested in this series as in Ranger’s Apprentice, for example, because there is way more action, but it is not all about war.
Divide and Conquer is a fictional story about saving the past. It takes place in the Middle Ages. There are wars going on in France. The Vikings kill a lot of Parisians, but Riq, Sera and Dak make sure they do not get to other parts of France. They can time travel by using an infinity ring and a metal square that has a flashing light to help the infinity ring. Sera puts the date, the code, and the time into the box so that they can get back to the year they want. They go back from 1885 to the year 885, and try to save the past to prevent war in the future. But when Dak gets captured by the Vikings, he has to figure out a plan to get back to Sera and Riq. 
This book is boring at the beginning but gets better and better along the way. In the beginning, there is a lot of talking, not enough action, and you don’t know what’s going on. It took me five or six chapters to figure out what was happening.  Suddenly the characters find that Vikings are attacking, but I was confused, I didn’t know where they came from. When Dak is captured by the Vikings, it starts to get exciting and interesting. While Dak is doing jobs, Riq and Sera have to figure out difficult clues so that they can travel back to their own period. 
I would recommend this book if you like reading a story with lots of fighting and ancient weapons. But some characters talk a lot, like Bill. He’s a historian who helps the three kids. And Rollo, a good Viking who helps them escape, talks a lot, too. Bill also makes some useless suggestions, like going back to their own period and leaving Dak in the year 885. Sera basically only worked on repairing the infinity ring. I would have liked her to work together with the others. Gorm, a really bad guy from the Vikings, and Siegfried, the leader of the Vikings, do most of the fighting against Rollo and Dak. Those parts are interesting and fun. The Vikings fight in ways that are very different from ours. They use drugs that make them get out of control and can turn them into powerful beasts.
You also learn that kids can be very smart. Riq can speak 16 languages. Dak reads a lot in books about history and sort of knows what’s going to happen. And Sera knows a lot about numbers.
There are huge wolf-beasts in the book. They kill the humans and eat them for their dinner. There’s one that Dak likes and they’re friends. Her name is Vigi. She attacks only if the people she knows order her to. She helps against the bad Vikings. But she’s the only good wolf-beast. The others can be very aggressive. I think the wolf-beasts are interesting because Vigi and Dak add some love to the story. 
This book has some interesting insights. I learned that in the Middle Ages people wore different clothes, like a tunic with one strap that goes around the shoulders. I also learned that lying will get you into trouble. But the main lesson is to make peace and not war. In the end I recommend this book to all kids interested in time travel: You get to see the old Paris when is was just being built, but I prefer to travel into the future.
- Lucas B., 9

Kid Review

Infinity Ring Book 2: Divide and Conquer

Carrie Ryan

Pub 11-2012, Scholastic


Divide and Conquer is the second novel in the Infinity Ring series by Carrie Ryan (also the author of the series The Forest of Hands and Teeth). When I began reading, I felt that instead of starting with the second book I should have started with the first book in this series. But I don’t think I will read another one: I would have to read the first one and I am not as interested in this series as in Ranger’s Apprentice, for example, because there is way more action, but it is not all about war.

Divide and Conquer is a fictional story about saving the past. It takes place in the Middle Ages. There are wars going on in France. The Vikings kill a lot of Parisians, but Riq, Sera and Dak make sure they do not get to other parts of France. They can time travel by using an infinity ring and a metal square that has a flashing light to help the infinity ring. Sera puts the date, the code, and the time into the box so that they can get back to the year they want. They go back from 1885 to the year 885, and try to save the past to prevent war in the future. But when Dak gets captured by the Vikings, he has to figure out a plan to get back to Sera and Riq. 

This book is boring at the beginning but gets better and better along the way. In the beginning, there is a lot of talking, not enough action, and you don’t know what’s going on. It took me five or six chapters to figure out what was happening.  Suddenly the characters find that Vikings are attacking, but I was confused, I didn’t know where they came from. When Dak is captured by the Vikings, it starts to get exciting and interesting. While Dak is doing jobs, Riq and Sera have to figure out difficult clues so that they can travel back to their own period.

I would recommend this book if you like reading a story with lots of fighting and ancient weapons. But some characters talk a lot, like Bill. He’s a historian who helps the three kids. And Rollo, a good Viking who helps them escape, talks a lot, too. Bill also makes some useless suggestions, like going back to their own period and leaving Dak in the year 885. Sera basically only worked on repairing the infinity ring. I would have liked her to work together with the others. Gorm, a really bad guy from the Vikings, and Siegfried, the leader of the Vikings, do most of the fighting against Rollo and Dak. Those parts are interesting and fun. The Vikings fight in ways that are very different from ours. They use drugs that make them get out of control and can turn them into powerful beasts.

You also learn that kids can be very smart. Riq can speak 16 languages. Dak reads a lot in books about history and sort of knows what’s going to happen. And Sera knows a lot about numbers.

There are huge wolf-beasts in the book. They kill the humans and eat them for their dinner. There’s one that Dak likes and they’re friends. Her name is Vigi. She attacks only if the people she knows order her to. She helps against the bad Vikings. But she’s the only good wolf-beast. The others can be very aggressive. I think the wolf-beasts are interesting because Vigi and Dak add some love to the story.

This book has some interesting insights. I learned that in the Middle Ages people wore different clothes, like a tunic with one strap that goes around the shoulders. I also learned that lying will get you into trouble. But the main lesson is to make peace and not war. In the end I recommend this book to all kids interested in time travel: You get to see the old Paris when is was just being built, but I prefer to travel into the future.

- Lucas B., 9

Teen Review
The Secret Tree
Natalie Standiford
Pub 5-2012, Scholastic, $16.99
The Secret Tree by Natalie Standiford is about a girl named Minty who calls herself “Minty Fresh”. Her and her friend Paz (“Pax-a-Punch”) are roller derby fans. I think that The Secret Tree is very similar to The Apothecary by Maile Meloy and Ian Sheonherr. They’re similar not only in their way of writing but also in the plot: a pretty normal girl getting involved with a troubled and adventurous boy. I think that The Secret Tree is a thriller but also a friendship fiction book. 
At the beginning of the story, Minty starts seeing flashes in the woods  After seeing many of these flashes, she tries to catch the person making the flash but soon he’s gone. She follows him into the woods, and on her way out of the forest she hears a tree that seems to be murmuring something. She tries to peek inside the tree to see if there’s somebody inside. There isn’t, but there is a piece of paper: “nobody likes me except my goldfish.”  Some pretty weird things start to happen and they seem to be connected to one night that happened the summer before. When she does catch the flash, it’s a boy with a camera. He says he spies on the people around town and figures out which secret from the Secret Tree is theirs. There is a ghost that lives in a tree that eats the secrets that the people put there. Minty gets to know him better and they team up and try to solve the mystery of the weird things happening with the secrets. I think this book was very well written. I think that it’s one of those books that are so suspenseful that you can’t stop reading it. I think that one of the reasons it was good was that some of the elements of the book are definitely from the present, but other aspects would definitely be from a long time ago. I think it’s great that she combines all these elements and makes them from her own time period. I think that the book has a pretty good moral: everybody has flaws. I think the writer really shows that even the people who seem flawless aren’t always. 
I think that, overall, this is a well-written book. I think that, unlike other books, this book was about the dark side of people. I also like the plot because it shows that exiting things do happen in the suburbs.  I know that many authors set  their  horror novels in the country but I think  that the  author  combined  a lot of  original details  to her story. An overall 10 out of 10!
-Diana R., 9

Teen Review

The Secret Tree

Natalie Standiford

Pub 5-2012, Scholastic, $16.99

The Secret Tree by Natalie Standiford is about a girl named Minty who calls herself “Minty Fresh”. Her and her friend Paz (“Pax-a-Punch”) are roller derby fans. I think that The Secret Tree is very similar to The Apothecary by Maile Meloy and Ian Sheonherr. They’re similar not only in their way of writing but also in the plot: a pretty normal girl getting involved with a troubled and adventurous boy. I think that The Secret Tree is a thriller but also a friendship fiction book.

At the beginning of the story, Minty starts seeing flashes in the woods  After seeing many of these flashes, she tries to catch the person making the flash but soon he’s gone. She follows him into the woods, and on her way out of the forest she hears a tree that seems to be murmuring something. She tries to peek inside the tree to see if there’s somebody inside. There isn’t, but there is a piece of paper: “nobody likes me except my goldfish.”  Some pretty weird things start to happen and they seem to be connected to one night that happened the summer before. When she does catch the flash, it’s a boy with a camera. He says he spies on the people around town and figures out which secret from the Secret Tree is theirs. There is a ghost that lives in a tree that eats the secrets that the people put there. Minty gets to know him better and they team up and try to solve the mystery of the weird things happening with the secrets.

I think this book was very well written. I think that it’s one of those books that are so suspenseful that you can’t stop reading it. I think that one of the reasons it was good was that some of the elements of the book are definitely from the present, but other aspects would definitely be from a long time ago. I think it’s great that she combines all these elements and makes them from her own time period. I think that the book has a pretty good moral: everybody has flaws. I think the writer really shows that even the people who seem flawless aren’t always.

I think that, overall, this is a well-written book. I think that, unlike other books, this book was about the dark side of people. I also like the plot because it shows that exiting things do happen in the suburbs.  I know that many authors set  their  horror novels in the country but I think  that the  author  combined  a lot of  original details  to her story. An overall 10 out of 10!

-Diana R., 9

Staff Pick
If you loved When You Reach Me, you’ll fall instantly, passionately in love with this book. Set in the middle-space where change happens — between school years, between elementary school and middle school, between childhood and teenagehood, the suburbs and the woods — this setting is ripe for transformative storytelling that sweeps you away on a cast of characters you’ll recognize from your own childhood. With just enough magic and mystery, lazy, timeless afternoons, and snooping, this is a perfect summertime — or anytime — read.
Sarah G.

Staff Pick


If you loved When You Reach Me, you’ll fall instantly, passionately in love with this book. Set in the middle-space where change happens — between school years, between elementary school and middle school, between childhood and teenagehood, the suburbs and the woods — this setting is ripe for transformative storytelling that sweeps you away on a cast of characters you’ll recognize from your own childhood. With just enough magic and mystery, lazy, timeless afternoons, and snooping, this is a perfect summertime — or anytime — read.

Sarah G.