Teen Review
Such a Rush
Jennifer Echols
Pub 7-2012, MTV Books, $16.99
Such a Rush by Jennifer Echols is a thrilling and well-paced book.  Echols is known for her young adult romance novels that are both dramatic and funny, but Such a Rush is different from Echols’s other novels. While it’s a romance novel, there is also a deep love of the protagonist’s mission to fly, which starts out as an interest and progresses into a potential career. The book follows a character who aims to separate herself from the past.
The main character, Leah, is troubled and tormented by her schoolmates. Her only friend is Molly. Leah’s mom cannot hold a stable job and is frequently evicted from their trailer park home. Leah is done with complaining about her unprivileged life and takes up a job at Heaven Beach Airport: Hall Aviation.  At fourteen, she works in an office and helps pump aviation gas, and eventually decides she wants to fly the airplanes at Hall Aviation. She saves enough money and forges her mom’s signature on the permission slip. Mr. Hall, the owner of Hall Aviation, cuts a deal and agrees to teach her to fly.
This book was an enjoyable read, but sometimes the way Leah reacts to situations came off as irritating. For instance, the relationship between Leah and her mom. Her mom is always off drinking with her new boyfriend, she barely works, and she leaves Leah by herself most of the time.  She only goes to Leah when she needs money. Even then, Leah has to lie to her mom because she knows her mom will waste it. I wanted a heated argument where Leah calls out her mom for being a bad parent; how she is always out, immature, and not what a mom should be. But Leah kind of just accepts her mom’s behavior and goes with what she has. In the end, she does break away, though. Leah wants to attend college and refuses to move again with her mom.
Leah’s friend, Molly, is a great addition to her life. Molly is rich and lives a well off lifestyle. At the start of their friendship, Molly accuses Leah of stealing her previous boyfriend. They were able to look over that issue, but both were afraid of being too close to each other. Molly opens the “outside” world to Leah; before Molly, Leah was unaware of what a normal family should be. She mistook Molly’s behavior as a way of bragging, but Molly actually wants to help Leah. Molly is one of the few who knows Leah’s family situation. I understand that Leah thought Molly was attacking her for being “trailer trash”, However, Leah should have given Molly more credit for sticking by her.
Such a Rush is a great summer read. It portrays Leah’s romance, dreams, and a solution to her problems. She becomes closer to the Hall twins and Molly. Leah has a great passion to fly and to be more than what she started off as. Echols eloquently describes what it is like to be on a plane, high above in the sky. Readers can imagine what it feels like to be cooped in the airplane and controlling it. “Civilizations petered out and nature preserves took over, with wide rivers snaking through swamps to the sea”.
-Gabrielle C., 15

Teen Review

Such a Rush

Jennifer Echols

Pub 7-2012, MTV Books, $16.99

Such a Rush by Jennifer Echols is a thrilling and well-paced book.  Echols is known for her young adult romance novels that are both dramatic and funny, but Such a Rush is different from Echols’s other novels. While it’s a romance novel, there is also a deep love of the protagonist’s mission to fly, which starts out as an interest and progresses into a potential career. The book follows a character who aims to separate herself from the past.

The main character, Leah, is troubled and tormented by her schoolmates. Her only friend is Molly. Leah’s mom cannot hold a stable job and is frequently evicted from their trailer park home. Leah is done with complaining about her unprivileged life and takes up a job at Heaven Beach Airport: Hall Aviation.  At fourteen, she works in an office and helps pump aviation gas, and eventually decides she wants to fly the airplanes at Hall Aviation. She saves enough money and forges her mom’s signature on the permission slip. Mr. Hall, the owner of Hall Aviation, cuts a deal and agrees to teach her to fly.

This book was an enjoyable read, but sometimes the way Leah reacts to situations came off as irritating. For instance, the relationship between Leah and her mom. Her mom is always off drinking with her new boyfriend, she barely works, and she leaves Leah by herself most of the time.  She only goes to Leah when she needs money. Even then, Leah has to lie to her mom because she knows her mom will waste it. I wanted a heated argument where Leah calls out her mom for being a bad parent; how she is always out, immature, and not what a mom should be. But Leah kind of just accepts her mom’s behavior and goes with what she has. In the end, she does break away, though. Leah wants to attend college and refuses to move again with her mom.

Leah’s friend, Molly, is a great addition to her life. Molly is rich and lives a well off lifestyle. At the start of their friendship, Molly accuses Leah of stealing her previous boyfriend. They were able to look over that issue, but both were afraid of being too close to each other. Molly opens the “outside” world to Leah; before Molly, Leah was unaware of what a normal family should be. She mistook Molly’s behavior as a way of bragging, but Molly actually wants to help Leah. Molly is one of the few who knows Leah’s family situation. I understand that Leah thought Molly was attacking her for being “trailer trash”, However, Leah should have given Molly more credit for sticking by her.

Such a Rush is a great summer read. It portrays Leah’s romance, dreams, and a solution to her problems. She becomes closer to the Hall twins and Molly. Leah has a great passion to fly and to be more than what she started off as. Echols eloquently describes what it is like to be on a plane, high above in the sky. Readers can imagine what it feels like to be cooped in the airplane and controlling it. “Civilizations petered out and nature preserves took over, with wide rivers snaking through swamps to the sea”.

-Gabrielle C., 15